Category Archives: Landscape photography

Taking Silhouettes

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Never shoot towards the light.” We’ve probably all heard this old photography “rule,” but, for now, let’s treat it more as a general guideline. If you want to shoot some photos that really pop, that really jump out and grab you—shoot towards the light.

Silhouettes are photos where your subject is dark against a bright background. Using a sunrise or sunset as the backdrop for your subject can give stunning results—your subject becomes a bold black figure against a canvas of bright and vivid colour.

When you use a bright and cloud filled sky as your background, your subject often doesn’t come out pure black, but comes across as dark and moody against a brooding sky.Read More

Tips by Al Sanchez

Don’t you just love silhouettes? If you’ve ever seen those detective movies you know what silhouettes are. The detective only shown as a dark figure talking is the silhouette. The silhouette photo is a great picture that can be very amazing and visually appealing. These photos can make for mysterious, commanding, gentle, and intriguing photos. It can be a great way to put emphasis on a subject.

The most common and easy way to use a silhouette is when there is a single primary subject of interest. This is the easiest way to light as you simply light it from behind the subject and thus the subject will be turned into a silhouette. Of course, you can try more creative things like having silhouettes of hundreds of people but that will be much more difficult.

When taking silhouette pictures the shape and form of your subject is critically important. You will not see any of the details within the subject and only see their outline. The lines of the subject become very prominent. When taking photos of people as silhouettes, it can be very useful as you are seeing them as lines and shapes. Taking these types of photos of people can greatly improve your photos of people and posing them properly.

The background of your silhouette is extremely important. If your background is as dark as the silhouette it will be very hard to see the subject. The background color should be somewhat contrasting to the silhouette. This will make the subject stand out.

When taking silhouette photos, try to keep everything simple. Think of simple concepts to portray in your images. Because the silhouette strips the subject of all details it is a much simpler form of photography. Taking a silhouette against the sky can work very great and you most likely don’t even need any extra lighting. Simply place the subject against the sky and the light will make them become dark and silhouetted where the sky will be fully visible.

Silhouette photos can be very emotional photos. It can show very conflicting and deep emotions such as fear, sadness, grief, etc.

To practice silhouette photos simply try looking at a subject and see their outline and shape. This will give you a good idea of what they will look like when silhouetted. If you want to practice

About the Author

Al Sanchez has a great program that teaches you how to take better photos. He also teaches people how to sell pictures online.

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Light and shadow-Thean Hou temple by day

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The big bright red lanterns displayed at Thean Hou temple were so colourful. Many visitors were attracted to come to take photos during the day and even in the night.. Many Chinese worshippers were also there praying to the Goddess Thin Hou to bless them with good health, prosperity and good luck.

The blazing afternoon sun was directly on my head as I was going up to take some photos of the colourful lanterns and people offering their players in the temple. ’It was then I realized that it was much more than just the beauty of the lanterns itself that was drawing my eye. It was the interplay of light and shadow, creating a pattern of a series of black circle of the lanterns on the floor in front of the temple.

I am not the type of serious photographers specialized in light and shadow photography, who work with light to define the subject, and seek shadow to conceal it. They take maximum advantage of the “golden hours” at dawn and dusk to bathe their images in the beauty of rich, warm colour.

I took these photos and I hope you all like it. I would like to come back here to continue shooting the thean Hou temple with red lanterns display at night

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The landscape of sunrise and sunset in Japan

These are some pictures which I took four years ago when I was in Japan on a visiting tour. The landscape photos, sunrise and sunset, lighting and shadow were taken somewhere in a tourist spots where I was on the ways to visit Mt Fuji.

Photo by Chrisy

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Landscape Photography: Tips To Enhance The Experience
By: Albreht Moy

One of the great things about landscape photography is that the possibility is endless on where you can go, what to take a picture of and it all starts with a few steps from your own back door. The horizon is your limit.

Lighting speaks volumes in landscape photography. Getting up with the sun at dawn, watching the animals hurry around as they gather their food for the day, and while the sun is just peaking its face over the background would make for great photo with perfect light. When the sun is on its way down, this is great for a landscape picture of peace and serenity. This time of day is when animals and people are heading home for the night where the land is clear of “clutter” and the trees, skies and land are open. Shadows will add depth to any photo of the landscape and give it more of a three-dimensional feel to it.

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Landscape photography should be relaxing and fun to do. It also requires some time to get the precise composition. When a camera is slightly shifted one way or another, you can see how it will dramatically improve the picture you are looking to take. When it comes to taking a picture of the landscape, taking one photo is just as good as taking ten. You do not have to waste film on something that can be done right the first time, this can be achieved with a bit of patience, and some practice.

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When photographing landscapes, give your photo a feeling of depth by including close objects in the frame as well as the distant objects.

A fine lens for landscape photography is the 50 mm lens that comes as standard equipment on many SLR cameras.But if you are seriously interested in photographing landscapes, a good lens to have would be a wide-angle lens.

Losing detail due to camera shake is the biggest problem in landscape photography.So, a tripod and a shutter release cable are very helpful tools to have.

Article Source: http://www.articlecube.com

Albreht Moy offers photographs for sale at his website.

light and shadow

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Light creates shadow and shadow in return, enhances the appearance of the subject.

The sun’s shadow identifies the time of the day. It can tell whether it is morning, noon or afternoon just by its shadow. Shadows are also essential in some types of arts like painting, photography and stage play.

So can anyone tell me what time SenimanMenangis took this picture ?

Create Photo Impact by Shooting Towards the Light

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Photo by Kaali

Story by Jeff Galbrait

Never shoot towards the light.” We’ve probably all heard this old photography “rule,” but, for now, let’s treat it more as a general guideline. If you want to shoot some photos that really pop, that really jump out and grab you—shoot towards the light.

Silhouettes are photos where your subject is dark against a bright background. We have probably all taken shots like this by mistake—when taking a picture of a friend or relative who was standing in front of a window, or standing with the sun behind them, etc. But photos like this give us a dark subject with a bright, washed out background—not exactly what we were hoping for. This happens because the digital sensor in our camera cannot accurately capture scenes with such high contrast. However, this “weakness” can be turned to our advantage.

When silhouettes are created on purpose, they can be among the most striking and engaging of shots:
Using a sunrise or sunset as the backdrop for your subject can give stunning results—your subject becomes a bold black figure against a canvas of bright and vivid colour.

When you use a bright and cloud filled sky as your background, your subject often doesn’t come out pure
black, but comes across as dark and moody against a brooding sky.

So lets take a look at how you can use your digital camera to create silhouette shots with impact.

Here a few tips for getting better silhouette shots:

· You will need to get familiar with your camera’s exposure compensation feature to get the most out of your silhouette shots—your camera manual should contain simple instructions on how to use this feature.

· Most digital cameras have an exposure compensation range of –2 to +2 that is adjustable by increments of 1/3—don’t be afraid to try them all.

· Use “+” exposure compensation to make your shots brighter and “-” exposure compensation to make them darker.

· When shooting these high contrast shots, your camera’s default exposure settings may not give the results that your are looking for—so, shoot, then review, shoot, then review.

· Don’t completely rely on your camera’s view screen either. Taking several shots at different exposure settings will give you the best chance of getting the shot you really want—photos often look very different when viewed at home on your computer screen.

Happy shooting, and remember, don’t be afraid to shoot towards the light.
For more digital photography tips, visit Jeff Galbraith’s web site: http://www.jeffgalbraithphotography.ca

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jeff_Galbraith

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Sunrise photos

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Sunrise at Tanjung Dawai by Kaali

Taking sunset photos

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Photos by Kaali

Taking sunset photos can add excitement and warmth to your travel photography.

The sunset and sunrise glow can bask a scene in orange light, adding excitement, and warmth to your images.

Kaali who lives in Sungei Petani captured the sunset when he passed by the padi fields on the way home for a short holiday recently. Thanks for his sharing

Anyone who like to share photos here can send in to ycbiz99@gmail.com