It’s a Olive-backed Sunbird

img_6485avf

The male Olive-backed Sunbird

img_6481avf

The female Olive-backed Sunbird

img_6480avf

I Got it!

The colorful little birds returned as I expected! I finally got to snap both of them together while they were searching for food in my little garden. They were chirping, playing and singing. This time I caught them, male and female courting together.

The female bird perched on my front gate and the male followed. At first they were far apart but the male moved nearer to her. Although she hopped away but the male kept moving close.. The male performed the courting dance advancing nearer to the female bird. They were so engrossed with each other that they seemed not to be aware of anything else.

They were so occupied courting and dancing in excitement that their sense of alertness were not focused. They seemed so much in love that they didnt even know that I had come so near with my Canon camera 30D and 70-200mm telephoto zoom lens, standing behind my car, clicking continuosly. Finally they sensed my presence as I wanted to go for closer shots and they flew away.

These colorful little birds are actually the Olive-backed Sunbird. My blogfriend Birgitte from Denmark emailed me with a link to the information and the name of these birds. Thanks a lot Birgitte.

The sunbirds are a group of very small birds which feed largely on nectar, although they will also take insects, especially when feeding young. Their flight is fast and direct on their short wings. Most species can take nectar by hovering, but usually perch to feed most of the time.

The Olive-backed Sunbird is common across southern China to the Philippines and Malaysia down to northeast Australia. They are small songbirds, at most 12cm long. The underparts of both male and female are bright yellow, the backs are a dull brown color. The forehead, throat and upper breast of the adult male is a dark, metallic blue-black. Read more

img_6477aavf

img_6479avf

img_6478avf

Advertisements

12 responses to “It’s a Olive-backed Sunbird

  1. Great subject. These are wonderful birds – so colorful, and they look very quick and busy. Great captures.

  2. Nice photos all of them , but the top photo is fantastic, a perfect shot. Congratulation.

  3. Hey, you’re a peeping tom on courting birds! However, it’s for the sake of photography. Get more such pictures, they’re wonderful. At last you got both of them together in one frame. That’s very nice.

  4. Hey, your patience paid off. Small bird photography is very challenging and it does require good equipment, a person willing to wait for the subjects and knowing their habits. Great job!

  5. Stphoto

    Thanks. I agree I am not well equipped and appreciate your comment.Most of these series of images were heavy cropped

  6. WOW
    I love birds and these are not in my area of this planet. I love that bright, shiny dark blue patch.
    Great shot and patience too

  7. CheyAnne Sexton

    Thank for dropping by and leaving me a nice comment

  8. i love birds! those are beautiful, and what a beautiful name (sunbirds)! they remind me of the goldfinch we have here, but with more colorful plumage!
    i usually shoot the birds thru my window while they eat at the feeder….yours are in a more natural setting, making for much nicer pictures!

  9. Barbara
    It’s really a nice comment.Thank You.

  10. thanks 🙂
    i agree it’s cool meeting new people with similar interests, whether it be photography or poetry, or writting in general; it’s nice to have different opinions to share & give each other pointers
    i like looking through your photography & other posts 🙂
    adding you to my blogroll x

  11. Pingback: Olive-backed Sunbird - Cinnyris jugularis | Birds of the World

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s